Resources

HELPFUL RESOURCES

How to Build a Projector Screen at Home

How to Build a Projector Screen at Home

Making a custom projector screen yourself is completely achievable. Building your screen is like creating an artist's canvas, it's a blank slate. Making it stand...

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Carl Makes Projector Recommendations

Carl Makes Projector Recommendations

Shopping for a projector is no easy task. Over the many years we have been in the business of making DIY Projector Screens, we have...

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How to Select a Projector Screen Material

How to Select a Projector Screen Material

You're ready to build the best projector screen on your block! You've come to the right place because it all starts with projector screen materials....

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How to Select Your Ideal Projector Screen Size

How to Select Your Ideal Projector Screen Size

Many things in life are subjective. The best projector screen size (for rooms to large venues) is one of them. We like to follow recommendations...

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HELPFUL VIDEOS

DIYwithRick: How to Build a Projector Screen
Make: How To Build A DIY Projector Screen
Scott S: Backyard Theater Setup

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

The projection screen material best for you depends on your projector, physical space, projection method, lighting environment, and other factors. Always choose the material that will be best for the majority of your viewing. For example, don’t base your buying decision solely on price or solely on the gain.

Generally speaking select a white material for a dark viewing environment like a movie theater.  If there is any light in the viewing environment that will be competing with the projector; use a light gray material for low light or a dark gray material for moderate light.

With that said, here are some popular uses for each material.

  • FlexiWhite, FlexiGray are the top-selling options for a wooden fixed frame, or portable kit where the screen is pulled tight and evenly in all four directions
  • ALR is the top selling option for a wooden fixed frame where the screen is pulled tight and evenly in all four directions, but is not portable
  • Ultra-White, Ultra-Gray and Ultra-ALR are the best options for designing your own roll down mechanism or stapling directly onto drywall (Max height: UW 98″, UG 86″ and UALR 90″)
  • ProWhite or ProGray are best when designing your own roll down mechanism or stapling directly onto drywall and you need a screen taller than Ultra (max height of 126-inches)
  • Rear Projection in White or Gray are the only options for placing the projector behind the screen.  It must have the words Rear Projection in the product title
  • Blackout Cloth is the best for an entry-level screen when the screen is pulled tight and evenly in all four directions
  • Nano Acoustic Flexi is the best option for placing your speakers behind the screen where the screen is pulled tight and evenly in all four directions
  • SheerWeave is best when designing your own roll down mechanism or stapling directly onto drywall and you have placed speakers behind the screen
  • SilverScreen: for passive 3D and a wooden frame, or portable kit where the screen is pulled tight and evenly in all four directions (2 projectors)
  • ProSilver: for passive 3D and a roll down mechanism or stapling directly onto drywall (2 projectors)

View Our Comparison Charts:  White Screens or Gray Screens

Generally speaking, we recommend using white projector screen materials for dark environments and gray projector screen materials for environments with ambient light. The darker you can get your viewing environment the better the results.  It is unlikely you will need gray if you have a dark viewing environment. Gray provides additional contrast when you have ambient light competing with your projector.

Ambient light is any light that exists in your viewing environment. It may be indoor light fixtures or street lights, etc. If you have a dark room where the lights can be turned off we call this controlled light versus dealing with a street lamp, for example, which you may not have control over. An example of a dark viewing environment is a movie theater, an example of low light might be a small light coming from the next room, moderate ambient light would be a light on in the same room as your screen and high ambient light might be from a window or door.

Unfortunately, none of our materials are meant for full sunlight.

Dusk/Sunset: If your only ambient light concern is 20 minutes of viewing time at dusk, go with white. If you will experience ambient light throughout the entire movie, even after the sun goes down, go with gray.

All of our projector screen materials are compatible with HD projection, though your projector, of course, will need to be capable of projecting a native HD resolution. That said, materials with little to no texture can provide the sharpest possible picture for your high-definition and 4K projected images.

It depends on the type of 3D system. There are two types of 3D; Active 3D (most common) and Passive 3D (2 projectors).

Ambient Light Rejecting (ALR) and Ultra-ALR are specialized products for everyday usage, HD & 4K Ultra HD in a dark to a moderately lit environment. It also works for both active 3D and with two passive 3D projectors when ambient light is controlled.

FlexiWhite and UltraWhite work great for everyday usage, HD, 4K Ultra HD and/or Active 3D in a dark viewing environment (Active 3D Glasses).

SilverScreen and ProSilver are specialized products for Passive 3D movie viewing and is the best solution for Passive 3D (Passive 3D Glasses). It is highly reflective and not necessarily meant for everyday usage – although we have had some people use it that way – it is not our recommendation. Every day, Non-passive 3D SilverScreen users may experience hotspots when paired with a bright projector. Passive 3D requires two passive 3D projectors.

Our other materials are not usually recommended for 3D usage – it may be possible in some cases, but you will get more pop from the materials mentioned above.

Our Ambient Light Rejecting (ALR) and Ultra-ALR Materials are not recommended for ultra/short-throw projectors or edge-blending because the high gain of the product may result in hot spots in these scenarios.

The best projection screen material right for you depends on your projector, physical space, projection method, lighting environment, frame, and other factors. Instead of asking which material is the best, ask yourself which material is best for my specific needs. For example, don’t base your buying decision solely on price or solely on the gain.  Buying a more expensive material that is not compatible with your projector, frame or lighting environment will not produce the desired results.

No, sorry it cannot. Front-projection screen materials are opaque. The image will not show through the screen.